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Keystone Human Services Presents
Highest Awards to Donald Enders Jr. and
Charles Hooker III

Keystone Human Services awarded Keystone’s highest honors to Donald Enders and Charles Hooker for their work to serve vulnerable people and “Advance the Human Spirit.”

Harrisburg, PA (PRWeb) November 13, 2013—Keystone Human Services’ Founding President, Dennis W. Felty, awarded Keystone’s highest honors to Donald Enders, Jr. and Charles Hooker III at the 41st Annual Meeting held at the Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey on November 7, 2013.   Both Enders and Hooker have a history of service to the profession of human service, Enders as a dedicated volunteer leader and Hooker as a senior executive.

Don Enders, Jr.

Don Enders, Jr. was presented with the Edna Silberman Humanitarian Award, Keystone’s highest award given to an outstanding citizen who has made a significant contribution to individuals, their community and to Keystone Human Services. Recognized for his role in making Keystone’s Vision real in the lives of others, Enders was honored for going above and beyond to serve vulnerable populations and to “Advance the Human Spirit.”

Don has served Keystone for more than twenty years, on both the Keystone Partnership Board and Keystone Human Services Board, where he is currently chairman.  Enders was also a visionary volunteer for Easter Seals of the Capital Region, which transitioned to Tri-County Society for Children and Adults, Inc. and joined the Keystone family of agencies in the 1990s.

Don is a recognized leader beyond his service with Keystone.  In business, Don heads Enders Insurance Associates, Inc. (EIA), as well as several other corporations. He is also a founder and board member of Centric Bank and sits on the Foundation Board of HACC and the Panther Ram Foundation.

Charles Hooker III

Charles Hooker III received the Dr. Joseph Adlestein Professional Leadership Award. This award recognizes a person who has been exemplary in the field of human service, one who has advocated for the rights of all children and adults, regardless of background or ability, to be part of their community and to be valued by society. Hooker has demonstrated his commitment to these values through his more than thirty years of service as a leader in the human service field. Presently, as Keystone Human Services’ Senior Vice President and CEO of Keystone Human Services International, Charlie is instrumental in the expansion of Keystone’s work , in particular  the international initiatives to improve the lives of children with disabilities throughout the country of Moldova and in parts of Russia. Hooker has also hosted groups of human service professionals from the countries of Moldova, Russia, and Azerbaijan and beyond to visit Keystone to learn about our American human service models and gain new insights to share with their colleagues at home. Of course, Hooker states that, “We have learned as much, if not more, from our foreign colleagues during these exchanges.”  Before beginning his tenure with Keystone seventeen years ago, Hooker was a specialist in drug and alcohol programs, as well as mental health initiatives.

Keystone Human Services’ awards were fashioned after two courageous leaders who laid the groundwork for today’s progress in support of the rights of those with disabilities and to honor contemporary commitment and leadership in the field of human service. Edna Silberman was a consummate leader dedicated to empowering those with disabilities to be active, valued participants in their community. Edna was director of the Aurora Club for many years and served on the organizing committee to establish Keystone in 1972. She also hosted a talk show on WGAL, where guests shared information about available human services within the community and pressing issues of the times.

Dr.  Joseph Adlestein was a designer of the Mental Health and Mental Retardation Act of 1966, which developed the concept that persons with disabilities had the right to live active and productive lives: that persons with mental illness and those with intellectual disabilities (mental retardation) did not have to be institutionalized and could be free to live in the community with appropriate support.  He worked tirelessly during his lifetime to make this belief a reality.

For more information about Keystone Human Services or these prestigious awards visit our web site at www.keystonehumanservices.org  or call Ann Moffitt, 717-232-7509 ext.133, amoffitt @ keystonehumanservices.org.

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